All Posts By

Norman

Coming Up for Air

By | Norm's Author Blog | 3 Comments

The creative process we discuss in these Blog postings can take many forms, including assisting others in their creative process. We are pleased to have been able to support our friend, Roger Rapoport, in the filming and production of a full-length movie titled “Coming Up for Air.”


Filmed in Michigan, it is the story of a collegiate diver whose incredibly stressful life as a nationally-recognized student/athlete is leading to his mental breakdown. The story revolves around his mother and how she must learn to cope with the worsening situation of her only son.

We feel it is a gripping movie. It has been recognized with a number of awards and has been an official selection at 22 film festivals at home and abroad and four best picture awards. We are proud to have had two roles in its development—as minor actors and also as an executive producer. In this period with our focus almost exclusively on COVID, this movie, completed before the pandemic outbreak, reminds us we need to recognize there are other significant social issues still with us. We feel it is a film well worth viewing and encourage you to watch it. “Coming Up for Air” is now available for streaming at https://vimeo.com/ondemand/comingupforair.

Finding Clues

By | Norm's Author Blog | 6 Comments

It is always interesting when your writing can be based on personal experience. Recently Ilene and I discovered an intriguing story in this way.

Because of COVID, we sometimes do our daily walk safely in Forest Hills Cemetery, located a few blocks from home. Because of my long interest in the Tyler family’s genealogy and history, I recently checked with the cemetery office to see if there were any Tylers buried there. They took out a map and indicated four Tyler gravesite locations, not counting our own. One site we knew about; the other three were harder to find.

One of the sites was located in Block 56, Lots 7 & 8. We strolled to this location and looked at every stone in the block. Not finding anything, we wondered if they had given us the wrong information. Fortunately, I was stubborn enough to kick some dirt away from a small area of a mostly-buried flat stone and exposed what was obviously a gravestone. Kicking away a little more dirt, we began to see lettering, and eventually were able to decipher the name, David Tyler. This photo shows what it looks like at this point, before we go back with brushes to clean it off properly.

Returning home, I looked through our three volumes of Tyler Genealogy and found a Doctor David Tyler who in 1830 moved from “Tyler Hollow” in Marcellus, New York, to Ann Arbor. Wow! I had found one of my relatives through this unique circumstance. I found information on him in Washtenaw County’s online history and on the genealogy web site, WikiTree.

Doctor David Tyler turned out to be an upright Ann Arbor citizen and an officer in the local Masonic Lodge. His brother was Comfort Tyler, also from Marcellus, a notable who had many distinctions as one of upstate New York’s early settlers. My special interest in Comfort had been established earlier when I wrote about him in my Tyler history book titled, 15 Generations of American Stories: Notable Descendants of Immigrant Job Tyler. It seems Comfort had foolishly become right-hand man for Aaron Burr when Burr tried to establish a new nation in the Louisiana Purchase with himself as head of this new government. When their small band of rebels was caught, both Burr and Comfort Tyler were put on trial before Chief Justice John Marshall of the Supreme Court. The historic Burr Conspiracy, written about in many books, resulted in both men being freed simply because their “actions” had never been realized. Comfort returned home, but with a sense of disgrace.

So I was connected with an interesting family and some fascinating history. Ilene pointed out that David Tyler was a contemporary of Robert S. Wilson, who built our own historic Greek Revival style house. The supreme irony would be to discover that David and Robert knew each other back in mid-19th century in Ann Arbor.

All in all, it was a wonderful example of how stories can come from anywhere. As writers, we should be able to find drama in the most innocent of instances; maybe even from brushing a little dirt from a stone.

750 Words

By | Norm's Author Blog | 5 Comments

During our months-long stay-at-home, many of us are thinking this might be a good time to do some writing. You may think–I always meant to begin my memoirs, or try writing a murder mystery, or wax philosophical. But there seem to be distractions and reasons not to begin.

Our son, Joseph, introduced us to an effective way to overcome such creative inertia. It is referred to as the 750-Word Exercise. There is one simple rule. Begin writing about a topic of interest to you and keep writing about it in one sitting, non-stop, for 750 words—no more, no less. If you are like most writers you will find that the first 250 to 300 words will represent your current thinking but following those initial words you should enter a freestyle writing where you don’t know what will come off your fingertips. But keep writing anyway until you reach 750 words (approximately 3 pages). Then take a break and come back to it in a day or two and see what you have. You may be surprised at where your free thinking led you, and hopefully you have something worth developing further. It might serve as a section for a coronavirus journal, or the beginning of a piece of fiction, or a more reflective piece.

We encourage you to try this 750-Word Exercise. And let us know what happens if you do. (Note this blog posting is only 233 words. Oh, well.)

A Time That Wasn’t

By | Norm's Author Blog | One Comment

Sometimes there are more engaging ways to share reflections on our common quandary. I offer my effort using verse.

A Time That Wasn’t

A COVID moment;
The rhythm of being takes pause.

An island in time,
A pact with fatalistic will.

Anxiously trusting
Our sacrifices will soon end.

A Time That Wasn’t,
Cloaking a new destiny.

The Philadelphia Story

By | Norm's Author Blog | 4 Comments

Although my book on the biographical history of the Job Tyler family (see previous blog) has now been self-published, I just came across a new biography that really needs to be shared.

The University of Michigan’s Clements Rare Books Library has a huge collection of artifacts from early American history. Recently the staff hosted an online discussion on one of their artifacts, the Scott-Montgomery family album, an excellent example of a complete and well-organized family photo album. The speaker mentioned key people in the Scott-Montgomery family, including Charlotte Hope Binney Tyler Montgomery. My ears perked up at the Tyler in the name and this encouraged me to do a bit of research. It turns out Charlotte was the mother of Colonel Robert Leaming Montgomery, whose wife was Hope Binney Tyler, a name found in our Job Tyler genealogy. Thus, through marriage our two families are connected, although it turns out it was more of a merger than a marriage.

Let me explain. Hope’s father, Sidney Frederick Tyler, was a Harvard-educated Philadelphia lawyer who organized four railroads in the late 19th century. Hope’s brother, George Frederick Tyler, was a wealthy Philadelphia banker who built one of the country’s last “great estates,” with horses, a dairy, forty employees, and a 10-car turntable garage. (His biography can be found in my book.)

Hope’s daughter was Helen Hope Montgomery Scott, who Wikipedia describes as a Main Line socialite and philanthropist and who Vanity Fair once called “the unofficial queen of Philadelphia’s WASP oligarchy.” She is most famous as the inspiration for the lead character Tracy Lord featured in the Philip Barry play, The Philadelphia Story, played by Katherine Hepburn in the film of the same name, and also featured in the musical-film High Society.

Although such family linkages are certainly intriguing to come across, I accept that such high-falutin’ ties will not make me any more societal or moneyed. I remain the same old Norm that I’ve always been; just ask Ilene.

A favorable review

By | Norm's Author Blog | Comments

For over thirty years, Ilene has been an active member of the Association for Preservation Technology, International. The most recent edition of the organization’s Bulletin includes a review of our historic preservation book. We are pleased with the reviewer’s assessment and want to share three brief excerpts with you.

Historic Preservation: An Introduction to Its History, Principles, and Practice is a foundational book written to reach every person who is exploring the depth and breadth of historic preservation. Beginning students will be inspired as they cover the extensiveness of this field and find ideas for their future careers. Storied professionals who have been practicing for years will find important details and case studies that can be applied to their own work. Norman and Ilene Tyler and Ted Ligibel have developed a concise narrative and presentation method that encourages the reader to continue exploring with each topic and chapter. . . This is the third edition of this influential book, and while this edition is 140 pages longer that the first, the added content is necessary to detail the development of the profession over the past 20 years. The Tylers and Ligibel are skilled at adding new content seamlessly to each subject. . . The Tylers, well-known in the field of preservation, along with their coauthor Ligibel, offer their long history of work in this field to entice the next generation of preservationists.” (Todd Grover, Principal, MacDonald and Mack Architects, Minneapolis)

Publishing a Song

By | Norm's Author Blog | 4 Comments

As of today, Norm is a published music composer. As some of you may know, for a while I have been working on a musical, entitled “What Does It Mean?” which includes the libretto and 15 songs about two married architects with differing dreams.

Recently I discovered a web site that makes thousands of pieces of sheet music available for free. It is called free-scores.com. If you are interested in exploring a wealth of music to download, check it out.

On this web site anyone can upload as well, so I selected one of the songs from my musical, including lyrics and piano, and published it online for public consumption. It will be interesting to see if anyone downloads it or comments on it. The song can be found either under “Norm Tyler” or at:  https://www.free-scores.com/sheetmusic?p=awznT8xztn

Writing a Memoir

By | Norm's Author Blog | 5 Comments

We would like to embolden you to consider taking pen (or computer) in hand and consider writing a personal memoir. Such a project can satisfy you in a number of ways. To encourage you we share the following thoughts and quotes other writers.

William Zinsser, in his book On Writing Well, says, “No other nonfiction form goes so deeply to the roots of personal experience as the memoir—to all the drama and pain and humor and unexpectedness of life. Memoir is the art of inventing the truth. What gives it power is the narrowness of its focus. The memoir writer takes us back to some corner of his or her past that was unusually intense.

“Memoir isn’t the summary of a life; it’s a window into a life; it’s a deliberate construction. The crucial ingredient in memoir is people. You must summon back the men and women and children who notably crossed your life. The most interesting character in a memoir will turn out to be the person who wrote it. The best gift to offer is the gift of yourself.”

Stephen King shared thoughts in his book, On Writing. “When you first write something, you should write it for yourself. When you rewrite it, write it for everyone else. Take out everything that isn’t the story. Once it’s out there, you don’t own it anymore, everyone else does.

“You learn best by reading a lot and writing a lot, and the most valuable lessons of all are the ones you teach yourself. Writing is magic, as much the water of life as any other creative art. The water is free. So drink.”

Gloria Steinem in her book, On the Road, says, “…there is no better moment in life than finding the right word.” In so many cases, like hers and perhaps like yours, the need to get the words out is the most compelling reason for writing. We do it to share our stories, to elicit responses from others, and because it feels good. Emily Dickinson said it simply: “Tell all the truth but tell it slant.”

15 Generations…

By | Norm's Author Blog | Comments

Indications are my new book, 15 Generations of American Stories: Notable Descendants of Immigrant Job Tyler, is selling like hotcakes. Thanks to all who have purchased a copy, or multiple copies, as a gift for the holidays. I hope everyone enjoys reading the colorful stories of many generations of Tylers, just as I enjoyed discovering them. It’s available on Amazon Books under my name (Norman Tyler).

There is now a Facebook page, titled “Job Tyler Family History,” providing a way to keep informed on this book and other Tyler family history.

Tyler History Book now available!

By | Norm's Author Blog | 4 Comments

I am pleased to announce my latest book, 15 Generations of American Stories: Notable Descendants of Immigrant Job Tyler, has just been published. Although focusing on the extended Job Tyler family, this narrative history should be of interest to any reader fascinated by the human side of the American experience. Included are 35 biographies collected from five eras of American history. Stories include Mary Sawyer Tyler, whose lamb was honored in a very popular poem; Joseph Tyler, murdered by Caribbean pirates; Comfort Tyler, accused of being a traitor in the Aaron Burr Conspiracy; Mary Tyler, burdened for her entire life by accusations at the Salem Witch Trials; Moses Coit Tyler, a distinguished academic who established the first national historical organization; two Tyler Civil War generals and heroes serving for separate Union and Confederate armies; and relatives of three different United States presidents, none being President John Tyler.

The stories included in its 193 pages could be a wonderful gift for family and friends. You can find it on Amazon Books under my name. I hope you enjoy reading about the colorful stories of these individuals as much as I enjoyed discovering them.